Saturday, October 16, 2010

Pawn Shops, Credit, & Jobs







A sizable and diverse crowd gathered across the street from the newly-opened pawn shop on Franklin Avenue and Park Place to protest the institution, chanting "No Pawn Shop!" and listening to speeches from Crow Hill Community Association leaders and the four elected officials who turned out (pictured speaking above, from top to bottom): Councilwoman Letitia James, State Senator Eric Adams, State Assemblyman Hakeem Jeffries, and State Assemblyman Karim Camara, all of whom stressed the negative impact pawn shops have on communities (increasing property crime and trapping people in downward spirals of debt) and demanded that the Department of Buildings investigate and shut down the pawn shop for violating New York City zoning and permit laws (see the document in the post below for more information). All four of our elected officials stressed the importance of building community, commended the work of the CHCA and other local associations, and urged local residents to continue to organize for safe, stable neighborhoods. Councilwoman James took on the issue of gentrification, saying that many reporters had asked her if the protest reflected neighborhood change. "This is not the beginning," said James, emphasizing that groups like Crow Hill had been at work for decades and that their, and her, goal was to improve the neighborhood for all residents.

Across the street, a small group gathered with the pawn shop owners, and after the speaking program finished, James and several of the organizers crossed the street to talk with them (bottom photo, above). What followed was a fair and frank discussion about the two issues that underlie the pawn shop's presence, namely, the unavailability of jobs and credit for many residents of Crown Heights. One woman pointed out that no bank or credit union would give her a loan and defended the pawn shop as a source of short-term credit, while a man said that he was sick of hearing new business owners say they were hiring "their own people" while lifelong residents were turned down and often forced out of their apartments in buildings undergoing renovations. Another local woman, hired by and working for the pawn shop, echoed his concern, saying that no other business had accepted her application and she was thankful to the pawn shop for offering her employment. All three individuals expressed frustration with the protest, saying that it did nothing to address their concerns or improve their access to jobs and credit, and asked whether the organizers would be willing to stage similar events to support their needs.

These are very, very important questions - pawn shops would not be viable businesses if mainstream lending institutions didn't routinely avoid and ignore lower-income communities, particularly communities of color. Likewise, the people who pawn shops exploit wouldn't have to patronize them if they had better access to employment opportunities, particularly in their neighborhoods - employment provides both income and improved access to credit. These two concerns are connected: many businesses opening on Franklin are the work of entrepreneurs who work borough- and city-wide. Improved credit access would allow would-be local entrepreneurs to compete in this market, and to provide employment at businesses of their own. Any way you slice it, pawn shops are a symptom (a pernicious one that the protesters are right to oppose) of a much larger systemic problem, one that creates markets for predatory lending by denying employment and credit to low-income communities.

Councilwoman James agreed wholeheartedly with the concerns raised, suggesting both improved financial education and a rally to insist that local businesses hire locally. It's up to those of us who were at the pawn shop protest today to work together with the elected officials and business owners to realize these goals - unless the larger issues are addressed, pawn shops will continue to target Crown Heights, even if this one gets shut down (and it seems likely it will). By way of helping out with this process, here's an important link - the Pratt Area Community Council is hosting FREE financial literacy courses just up Franklin Avenue at Lefferts Place this November, and registration is open now. Call 718-783-3549 or email Charrisse Smith at Charrisse_Smith {at} prattarea {dot} org for more information or to register.

One final thought: I'm sure there are dozens if not hundreds of pawn shops are doing business illegally around the five boroughs, and the DOB and NYPD just don't have the time or money to check on every single one. It takes a concerted effort by citizens to draw attention to these (and many other) problems - in a city as large as NYC, things happen when people make them happen, and not until.

39 comments:

  1. Action has always spoken louder than words!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. But if the pawn shop does get shut down, what happens to the woman who said that this is her only job opportunity? Will there be a place for her at the next upscale bar opening on Vanderbuilt Avenue? Thanks for including the feelings of the anti-protesters, I think that some of their positions are very valid.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Agreed - as a good friend of mine put it, "everyone involved in a transaction at a pawnshop [employees, owners, customers] is involved because they think it's their best option." If we're eliminating a source of short-term credit (however exploitative) and employment, we need to think about who that affects and how we can organize to address their needs, too.

    ReplyDelete
  4. we should start to look in to every protester life and see what they are doing wrong some of you might have secret lifes some might be gay some might be doing drugs some might be cheating on ther wifes some might be drug dealer i think its time to run a background check on each of you that came to the protest
    taking away jobs from us people is not fair and this bullshit class that you offer how to save money is bullshit how we going to save money if we dont have any or any jobs you people talk out of your ass i been liveing on franklin ave over 20 years when white people would never even come down the street and now you people act like franklin ave belongs to yal people this is a lot off bullshit and live on franklin ave what i saw the other day was the worst shit i ever seen people trying to close up a pawn shop get a life you a whole bunch of white - black want to be white hatters

    ReplyDelete
  5. To the Anonymous thug wana be above.... LMFAO! You obviously are one of those ignorant people who popped bottles during the Bush money making era ha? So now your broke. I understand. I would be mad if I was you as well. It must be hard living on Franklin Ave twiddling your thumbs praying that one of the owners give you a job. Grow up, put the bottle of vodka down at 1:30pm in the afternoon, iron something that fits you, wear a belt, take the sneakers off and put on a pair of shoes, get a resume (u know that thing you put all your info on w/pervious work history) if you have one then go and ASK for a job. GROW UP! You obviously DO NOT own a home, DO NOT have ambition(if your anxious about working on the avenue) and your prejudice. So go finish hiding behind your computer while the ENTIRE community laughs at how ignorant you are. OMG you are really ignorant. I can't believe YOU actually think that stopping the pawn shop was the worst "shit" you ever saw. What a looser.

    ReplyDelete
  6. the only job their good at is putting up the RIP POSTERS AND CANDLES FOR THEIR DEAD HOME BOYS from the block and getting DRUNK AFTER!!!! THATS THE MOST WORK THEY HAVE DONE you dont need a RESUME FOR THAT just a marker a box and a bottle of henny.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The underlying message of Saturday's protest was COMMUNITY. Community as in TOGETHER we can improve our neighborhood, Crow Hill Community Association puts out this challenge to the readers of this blog:

    To the person who said there is a lack of available credit in the community, please come to Tuesday's meeting with 1 or 2 people who feel the same way as you do and we will form a committee to work on bringing a fair & legitimate lending institution to the community. The first step will be to demonstrate that there is a need for this and then we'll take it from there. If you listened to Helen Beichel who spoke about her experience with the pawn shop on Albany you would have heard her address this issue.

    To the people who are concerned with the lack of jobs in the community, we want you to come to Tuesday's meeting as well. We are already exploring having representatives from local groups who help with employment at either November or December's meeting, you can help organize that.

    To those who are concerned about unfair landlord practices, please gather a list of landlords in the community, addresses of buildings where these activities take place and bring them to Tuesday's meeting so we can form a group to investigate how best to deal with this problem. Again, the first step will be to document unfair practices.

    To Anonymous @ 1:50 PM Please put your money where your mouth is and come to Tuesday's meeting prepared to work on one of the above issues and before you get too upset over the jobs that get taken away by closing the pawn shop, let's see how many jobs actually do materialize and how long they last.

    Crow Hill Community Association meets the 3rd Tuesday of each month (except July & August). October's meeting is 10/19 at 7:30 PM at LaunchPad, 721 Franklin between Park & Sterling Place. We welcome the entire community to join together and WORK on issues that effect us all. We are an ENTIRELY volunteer organization, it is a labor of love, so please, don't bring your "you should be doing this" face, instead bring your "I think this is wrong and I want to help change it" attitude,
    Thanks & see you Tuesday

    ReplyDelete
  8. The pawn shop awning has been removed!

    ReplyDelete
  9. crow hill community association is full of shit you people do nothing all this is just a front for the pawn not to open then all this will be forgotten and no one will get any help all this metting you people are doing is just to help your self like i said the black people on franklin thing they are white how are you going to give a job on the 3rd week of the month why are you lying i dont care much about the pawn shop and you ass hole i dont drink andbeen looking for work for a year now why dont you tell me wher you live and i will come over your house and you tell me wher i can get a job i will bring a nice pair of shoes and a shrit and iron my pants put your money wher your mouth is all i see is people moveing in to my hood and we have to move so no thanks to you people

    ReplyDelete
  10. Anonymous said...

    the only job their good at is putting up the RIP POSTERS AND CANDLES FOR THEIR DEAD HOME BOYS from the block and getting DRUNK AFTER!!!! THATS THE MOST WORK THEY HAVE DONE you dont need a RESUME FOR THAT just a marker a box and a bottle of henny.

    well we see you whie people still dont like us black people we have the proof black and white what you going to do about this crowhill i mean crown hights

    ReplyDelete
  11. next they will want no bars, liquor stores abortion centers, what happened to freedom to make a living.

    ReplyDelete
  12. To the Crow Hill Community Association: Thank you for fighting for the community and thank you for your hard work. And you all should come to the Community meetings and listen in as well as join the conversations. If you go to the associations FB fan page you can see what goes on. Before you judge them just come to a meeting and voice your opinion. They are great people... well we are great people. I am proud to be a member of the organization. I support all that they do and back them 100%. I wouldn't back them if they were anything but good. Give it a try and bring people from your building and block. We welcome them and we'll listen to what they have to say. BUT one thing... the "race card" is a little old and it has nothing to do with this. TRUST me. If you come to the meeting you'll see what it's really about. It's not about COLOR.... it isn't. If anything it's about character and inner self. Life is too short to be so angry... everyone is under pressure w/money due to the economy. Money is green. PS: the owner reads this blog daily and i dont think he'd hire anyone who uses the race card. So i'm not sure how many people he promised a job to, but maybe leaving comments with such anger on a public blog isnt a good idea. What if he reads it and changes his mind? He knows who he promised a job to. Trust me.. Eugene reads the blogs. He's a business man as well. Of course he wants to know whats going on. AND it's YOUR LANDLORDS not the association.... not the new movers... business owners or tenants... its YOUR LANDLORDS you need to speak to. THEY are the ones KICKING you out... NOT the white, black, asian, green, yellow or blue people who are moving in. ITS your LANDLORDS. talk to them and stop the blame game. Are they not accountable? Come on now...a spade is a spade. TALK TO YOUR LANDLORDS PEOPLE. A SPADE IS A SPADE.... seriously. I dare you to ask 15 landlords why are they kicking people out. Then evaluate the situation. Mr/Ms... I hope you come to the meeting. Cuz if ya don't your not standing up for nothing u want. If ya dont... then you dont have a say so or a right to be mad. if you dont come to the meeting then you dont have grounds. COME to the meeting and VOICE your opinion. They will listen, the people will listen.... but come w/an open ear and clear head. It's not a fight... be easy... it's a matter of understanding what's going on. And i was out there saturday... i heard a lot of racial remarks. It's not cool and it's not fair to judge people. people still use the race card? Let's try uniting and working together for a better change. Color has NOTHING to do with it. everyone isn't prejudice. I hope your not.... cuz that aint cool. I understand how you feel... just come and talk about it. Please.... it's worth a shot.

    Peace and Love guys!

    PS: Nick keep up the good work w/the blog's babe. Loving the honesty and the people on this are great. I appreciate the different opinions and understand how everyone feels. I just wish they would come out to the meeting and voice it. You are doing great for the community by allowing them to vent and open up on here. This is therapy for the community and we all need it.

    ReplyDelete
  13. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Crow-Hill-Community-Association/105993081216?ref=ts

    ReplyDelete
  14. i wrote that homie. I'm black i'm not white and I said it. I live in this neighborhood and all i see is my son's friends hanging on the corner all day and writing on posters. i proved my point you are ignorant because you assumed a white person said it. no need to continue talking to this idiot people. i guess i'm one of those 'black but wana be white" people you were talking about. get a life. thats y the damn senator had the no sagging sign on franklin avenue. he's black and he's against it so explain that. the fact they had the sign up there means thats the type of people we have on the avenue. it's not a black or white thing its an ignorant and smart thing. and you dont fall in the smart thing. by the way how old are you... u gota be about 10 yrs old.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I love my new car!! I love my new rims!! I love my new cloth i stay fresh every day but yet still i live with my moms and we cant pay our rent!!! but i love franklin ave !!! so new car new cloth and f@ck paying my rent take me to court bitch its the white people fault!!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  16. people listen up the community will do nothing to help you i will come to the meeting and i will will show you all that its all a joke ther is no jobs its all bull shit all they want to do is plant flowers in ther back yard get drunk at bars thats why they just love bars smoke weed they dont even care that 95 south has drug dealers selling weed from thir franklin ave still has hookers walking around i hope franklin away woke up and came out of ther bull shit lifes and for you black brother who became white trust me no white person will ever concider you are one of them you still a niggar in ther book so you wake up you must be around 6 years old
    all the state offical that came to the protest they have to or you people will not vote for you they dont give a shit about crown hights it all about money money money and showeing ther face

    ReplyDelete
  17. by the way you people got rid of the pawn shop when i spoke to pawn shop owner on the day of the protest he tols me how much he likeed the community he also gave $500 to your new program social media for kids no one said nothing but you people took his donation the man did not even open his store and gave $500 how many other store gave you did stacy sister fron noodle soup gave anything or fig and shit run down coffee shop with a day care in side you think that plave is legel ae the kids safe in ther i cant even get a job ther as a babysitter you guys wher quick to close up the pawn shop at least this man showed that he would help the community i will come to you meeting and bring up this issue you accept $500 from the pawn shop then protest him crow hill you think that right

    ReplyDelete
  18. Alright, we've got a lot of venom flying here - I've never deleted comments before, but please, lay off the racial slurs and the attacks on individuals or I might have to start. Three quick points, in order:

    1. We absolutely have to think about jobs and credit as the source of the pawn shop issue, and until there's better access to both, it won't go away.

    2. A pawn shop might offer a few new jobs and quick credit (at extortionist rates), but in the long run, it keeps both jobs and credit OUT of Crown Heights. Business owners (of every race) don't want to open up near a pawn shop, and lenders don't want to finance them, or anyone else. If we want more jobs and credit around here, we don't want a pawn shop driving both away.

    3. I said it up top and I'll say it again: Nothing happens in NYC unless people make it happen. CHCA has a long track record of making it happen, and they've made clear that they want to address all of these issues, not just the easy targets. That doesn't mean you have to like them or trust them (though you should go to their meetings and talk to them before you pass judgment), but it does mean that if you want things to change, you should learn from them. The only way to get local businesses to hire locally, or to get credit unions to offer their services locally, is to organize and demand it.

    ReplyDelete
  19. I agree w/Nick... and YES everyone know's that Eugene donated $500 to Social Media For Kids, YES because I told everyone. The association, the fellow merchants, NYPD and the political leaders know. All that needed to know, knows. In addition, please refrain from insulting the merchants on the avenue as they ALL have donated to our Kids Day Event last year. THOUSANDS of dollars was donated last year. Where is the respect people? This blog is about the "Pawn"shop not anything else. The people in the community fear the pawn shops presence due to the danger that might/will come behind it. No one is attacking the owner as an individual. We, They and You attacked the establishment and the fact the landlord didn't speak to Anyone before he rented it. The money donated will TAKE 5 children off the street and give them an opportunity to learn, be great community leaders and keep them busy after school hours. Again, please do not mix the two. If in fact the pawn shop has closed.... maybe they can use the center/space for community activities. We can use a community center.

    And everyone knows how we feel about the children in our community.... everyone. All the children know us very well and realize that we also care.

    ReplyDelete
  20. I WOULD LOVE TO SEE THE COMMUNITY RAISE FUNDS FOR A NEW COMMUNITY CENTER IN CROWN HEIGHTS THERES A NICE PLACE FOR SALE OR FOR LEASE ON ST MARKS IT USE TO BE A DAYCARE !!!!!!! I WILL SEND THE PIC TO NIC TODAY. SO MAYBE WE AS COMMUNITY CAN MOVE ON TO BIGGER AND BETTER THINGS (catch the kids break the cycle its the only way) GOOD BYE PAWN SHOP HELLO COMMUNITY CENTER!!!

    ReplyDelete
  21. We just want to make clear that there is no connection between Crow Hill Community Association and the Social Media For Kids project. Crow Hill Community Association is a 5013C not for profit organization, we have membership dues of $30/year for residential households and $125/year for merchants. Anyone may attend our meetings and work with us, only members may vote in our elections.

    The pawn shop has not given Crow Hill any money.

    ReplyDelete
  22. chca you won THE PAWN IS CLOSED just walk by i see the dOOR IS closed THE SIGN IS NO LOGER THIR dont you people feel good as a community we put them out WOW DO YOU THINK CRIME WILL GO DOWN BY 300%

    ReplyDelete
  23. crow hill you mean if the pawn shop would of gave chca a check for $500 same as it did for social media for kids you would of let the pawn shop open you are a buch of crooks you no better then the mafia WE WANT A FULL INVESTIGATION IN TO CHCA I BET YOU WE WILL FIND SOMETHING THEY DOING WRONG WE WILL MAKE THE PHONES CALLS TODAY WILL UPDATE THIS SITE LATER WITH MORE INFORMATION ABOUT CHCA

    ReplyDelete
  24. That's not what they meant at all - they said they are NOT affiliated with Social Media for Kids, which means they did NOT take any money. They didn't say anything about taking money to let the pawn shop open.

    ReplyDelete
  25. This is not a case of the CHCA winning or anyone else loosing...this is about respecting laws and regulations that govern what type of a business can be opened, what type of construction is allowable, etc etc

    ReplyDelete
  26. talking about rules and respecting laws and regulations ok lets all look around our self do we do that is every house on the block legal how many are renting apt that are not legal how many of you people are fixing your house with no permits lets get real wher the guy walking around franklin ave with his camera maybe he should take some pictures off all the unleagel stuff that goes around the hood in crown hights so if i was you i shut my mouth chca runs like the mafia WE NEED TO DO A FULL INVESTIGATIONS ON THIS GROUP WHO CALL THEM SELF COMMUNITY WHAT EVER BOARD SO FAR THEY DID NOTHING FOR ME OR MY FAMILY WE HAVE NO JOBS AND WE OUR ON WELFAR THAT OK BECAUSE YOUR TAX MONEY IS HELPING MY FAMILY THANK YOU ALL WORKING PEOPLE FOR HELPING US PEOPLE WITH NO WORK SEE YOU AT THE MEETING

    ReplyDelete
  27. So, if you believe and/or have seen illegal activities occurring, and people disregarding laid down laws and regulations in the environs, then stand up and do something about it to remedy this. If you believe the CHCA is unscrupulous, then please notify relevant agencies. If you see someone renovating their property and you think the scope of work they are undertaking requires permits, then report this to the relevant authorities.

    ReplyDelete
  28. WELL SAID I LIKE THAT WILL DO

    ReplyDelete
  29. All of you people are idiots

    ReplyDelete
  30. I could imagine that getting a job would be hard without any understanding of punctuation, grammar and spelling. Gotta love the passion though. . . . .

    ReplyDelete
  31. Look at those pictures - yuppies and hipsters. Trying to solve all of Brooklyn's problems with posters.

    ReplyDelete
  32. yuppies and hipsters they move to new york from bubba fu-- they cant afford the city so they move in the our hood wher the apt are still low rent then they try to get rid off use and rule our community all they are isa buch of drungs thats why you see so many bars all over the place look at the pictures at the pawn shop protest who thir no brothers or sisters just yuppies and hipster and some black people who think they are off them

    ReplyDelete
  33. A typical day at a pawn shop as reported by a famous local news paper:


    The 14kt gold hoop earrings were $250, more than a third of Michelle May’s rent. She bought them anyway, and treasured them, but wore them for only two months.

    One rainy afternoon in May, she decided to pledge the earrings to get something back, and took them to a local pawn shop. The pawn broker examined them for a moment, then set them on a scale. Minutes later, Ms. May was handed $80 and a contract.

    Ms. May, 48, used the $80 to buy groceries, a MetroCard to get to and from work on the subway, and a dinner of pizza for her three sons. She needed the money because she had given her father all she had — she makes $19 an hour as a social worker — to let him take the boys to Walt Disney World. She covered some of the expenses; her father paid the rest.

    The boys — 14, 10 and 8 — had no idea that they would soon be headed to Disney World. They also had no idea that their mother had pawned some of her favorite jewelry to enable them to go.

    The shelves and safes at the pawn shop are stocked with such secrets: Ms. May’s hoop earrings, the diamond-studded watch that Danny B, 34, used as collateral to pay parking tickets on his truck, the two gold bracelets Marty S, 23, temporarily pawned to pay his electric bill.

    “Most of the people that come in here live paycheck to paycheck,” says the pawn shop clerk. “They’re all working-class people,” he said "Good hard working people. Maybe they can’t manage their money properly, or because of the economy the way it is, or they can’t seem to catch a break. Pampers, light bills, the rent is due, car payment, oil bill. It’s for a mountain of things.”

    Joe gracefully walks up to the counter and puts his gold bracelet through the window. He's a regular states the pawn broker. "How much do you need to day joe?" asks the clerk confidently. "I just need to pay my cable bill" he explains "give me a hundred". Three minutes later Joe is out the door with the cash and his contract. The clerk turns to me and says "He'll be back next week and it will cost him 112.00 dollars, one hundred that's what he borrowed and twelve that's for the shop, if the cable company turns off his service they'll charge a lot more to reconnect it."

    Its the same story all over, bounce check fees, cash advances on credit cards, late fees etc etc when you compare the costs Pawn shops are much more economical.

    To spend time behind the counter of a Pawnbroker is to glimpse the commerce of the city at its most primitive and basic need. For a place filled with small, precious things, the pawnshop and its customers carry heavy burdens. The story of Ms. May’s earrings and their eventual fate — like the hundreds of thousands of other items that pass in and out of the city’s pawn shops each year — illustrates the murky ground between financial help and sentimental regret, between luxury and necessity, that the stores occupy.

    The pawn shop is nothing like the seedy stereotype of a pawn shop seen on TV or in the movies. It is a brightly lighted storefront in NYC, near the hum of a busy metropolis.

    Ms. May comes back three weeks later and together with her contract and ninety one dollars and forty cents redeems her precious earrings and places them back into her ears where they belong.

    ReplyDelete
  34. A typical day at a pawn shop as reported by a famous local news paper:


    The 14kt gold hoop earrings were $250, more than a third of Michelle May’s rent. She bought them anyway, and treasured them, but wore them for only two months.

    One rainy afternoon in May, she decided to pledge the earrings to get something back, and took them to a local pawn shop. The pawn broker examined them for a moment, then set them on a scale. Minutes later, Ms. May was handed $80 and a contract.

    Ms. May, 48, used the $80 to buy groceries, a MetroCard to get to and from work on the subway, and a dinner of pizza for her three sons. She needed the money because she had given her father all she had — she makes $19 an hour as a social worker — to let him take the boys to Walt Disney World. She covered some of the expenses; her father paid the rest.

    The boys — 14, 10 and 8 — had no idea that they would soon be headed to Disney World. They also had no idea that their mother had pawned some of her favorite jewelry to enable them to go.

    The shelves and safes at the pawn shop are stocked with such secrets: Ms. May’s hoop earrings, the diamond-studded watch that Danny B, 34, used as collateral to pay parking tickets on his truck, the two gold bracelets Marty S, 23, temporarily pawned to pay his electric bill.

    “Most of the people that come in here live paycheck to paycheck,” says the pawn shop clerk. “They’re all working-class people,” he said "Good hard working people. Maybe they can’t manage their money properly, or because of the economy the way it is, or they can’t seem to catch a break. Pampers, light bills, the rent is due, car payment, oil bill. It’s for a mountain of things.”

    Joe gracefully walks up to the counter and puts his gold bracelet through the window. He's a regular states the pawn broker. "How much do you need to day joe?" asks the clerk confidently. "I just need to pay my cable bill" he explains "give me a hundred". Three minutes later Joe is out the door with the cash and his contract. The clerk turns to me and says "He'll be back next week and it will cost him 112.00 dollars, one hundred that's what he borrowed and twelve that's for the shop, if the cable company turns off his service they'll charge a lot more to reconnect it."

    Its the same story all over, bounce check fees, cash advances on credit cards, late fees etc etc when you compare the costs Pawn shops are much more economical.

    To spend time behind the counter of a Pawnbroker is to glimpse the commerce of the city at its most primitive and basic need. For a place filled with small, precious things, the pawnshop and its customers carry heavy burdens. The story of Ms. May’s earrings and their eventual fate — like the hundreds of thousands of other items that pass in and out of the city’s pawn shops each year — illustrates the murky ground between financial help and sentimental regret, between luxury and necessity, that the stores occupy.

    The pawn shop is nothing like the seedy stereotype of a pawn shop seen on TV or in the movies. It is a brightly lighted storefront in NYC, near the hum of a busy metropolis.

    ReplyDelete
  35. I cited this article (from the NYTimes in 2007) in a post about this pawn shop earlier: http://ilovefranklinave.blogspot.com/2010/09/pawn-shop-what-we-know-whats-to-come.html. That said, you've made some editorial edits to it ("pawn shops are much more economical"), and it doesn't address the issue of property crime rising when pawn shops open (if you have a study to refute the ones I cited earlier, please share it). Also, if "Joe" had a credit card or other line of credit, it wouldn't cost him 12% a week to pay his cable bill. Sure, it's better than the alternative, but that doesn't mean it's good.

    ReplyDelete
  36. Innocent bystander shot in Brooklyn

    Full story: WABC 7

    Two people were shot in Crown Heights at the intersection of Utica Avenue and Eastern Parkway.
    still worry about a pawn shop you people are the bigest joke in crown hights

    ReplyDelete
  37. The association, the fellow merchants, NYPD and the political leaders know. All that needed to know, knows.
    Pawnbrokers

    ReplyDelete
  38. This was very interesting to read! I need to come back and read this. I need to show my brother it as well.

    William | http://www.calcitypawn.com

    ReplyDelete
  39. Pawn shops are honestly so fun to go explore around and see what you can find. There can be so many hidden treasures that you never knew about!

    Jim Tracy | http://naperbuyers.com/

    ReplyDelete