Tuesday, April 12, 2011

ILFA Loves Reader Tips

One reader passed along this photo yesterday, and another posted a link to this great local event on ILFA's Facebook Page over the weekend. In case I don't say it enough, I LOVE it when readers send photos/tips/stories/suggestions/events/pretty much everything (I'll even post your hate mail if I think you've got a point). Never hesitate to share the news, whether by email, Facebook post, comment threads, or whatever other technology you prefer.

Also, let's move the discussion about Fisher's over here, shall we - I have a policy of not telling people what to do on the comment threads, but I want to keep the emphasis for that post on the great event Manuel is planning for Participatory Urbanism at LaunchPad.

7 comments:

  1. in regards to what was being posted below, I agree that at times Tony says things that may not be PC - But in no way does that mean he isn't a great person who is doing great things in the community.

    He's been here for years, and may get frustrated at times (working in the service industry, I bet he does) -- but to go back in his (then) personal twitter feed some 10 months to find him complaining (in non-PC terms, sure) about his day-to-day interactions with people doesn't make him someone not all about bettering the community.

    His business(es) have given to the CHCA (both financially and through food for their meetings), to the Franklin Avenue Kids Day, and to many other awesome things in the area. To say that because he calls people a term you don't approve of that he isn't a good person is ridiculous. If you are that offended, let him know - don't badmouth him anonymously on a website.

    Maybe my only suggestion for Tony would be to keep the personal twitter-feed and the business twitter-feed consistently separate.

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  2. Tony was also extremely nasty (online - Brooklynian) when the Breukelin Coffee House was opening around the time of the Pulp and Bean's opening. I recognize that he provides goods and services to the neighborhood, but he does it in a self-righteous and arrogant way, and it's a complete turn-off. I find his overall attitude towards local residents - new and old, "hipsters" and "chickenheads" (his words, not mine) repulsive and offensive. I don't need to say this to his face, I just don't shop at his stores.

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  3. Repeated use of the term "chickenhead" is not "frustration"; it's racism.

    "A chicken head was hitting her head. She said her weave hurt. I think she's just having a reaction to the fried chicken."
    July 16, 2010 7:48:40 PM EDT via Twitterrific

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  4. I agree that the online personality of Tony isn't great and he should never use racist language. However, I think it is important to get to know the people beyond their online personas and actually meet Tony. I don't think he knows what some of the thing he says mean beyond the context he hears them. I had no idea what the term "Chicken head" was.

    I think Fishers and Pulp & Bean are some of the only stores on the avenue that are trying to cater to all the residents on Franklin. I think that the fact that Tony is really working to do that means that he is a more complex person than his twitter leads you to believe.

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  5. Anyone who personally knows Tony or his family knows that he's more invested in the community -- in everyone in the community, not just those who "discovered" it in the past three years -- than any other purveyors on or near Franklin. His father opened the business over 30 years ago and raised his family in the community. Tony and his brother Mohamed have seen the neighborhood through ups and downs that many of us can't even imagine. To judge him or what he's doing based on a twitter feed is absurd and incredibly narrow-minded.

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  6. TONY is the MAN !! You are noone like HATTERS!!

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  7. It's possible that Tony is a nice guy (he certainly seems that way), but that he is also a racist guy. We live in a society that is historically racist. Growing up in the U.S., it's near impossible to get away from that. No matter the color of your skin.

    Did he really know what "chickenhead" meant? He had enough context to relate it to women with weaves and to fried chicken, the stereotypical food of black people. He understood enough for his use of it to be offensive.

    It's impossible to read these comments from his Twitter feed and not react to them. They are disgusting. Should we blame him for them? I think it's easy to blame him, as if the rest of us are exempt from these attitudes. But we all live and participate in this racist society everyday.

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